awkwardsituationist

awkwardsituationist:

  • globally, 77,600,000 girls do not attend school
  • there are 33,000,000 fewer girls than boys in primary education
  • girls with secondary education are 6 times less likely to be married as children
  • a girl with 7 years of schooling in the developing world will have 2.2 fewer children
  • a child born to a literate mother is 50% more likely to survive past the age of 5
  • two thirds of the 775,000,000 illiterate adults, and 63% of illiterate youth, are female
  • literate mothers are twice as likely to immunize their children and send them to school
  • a girl who completes basic education is 3 times less likely to contract HIV
  • a girl earns 20% more as an adult for every additional year of education she receives
  • a nation’s GDP rises an average of 3% when 10% more its girls attend school
  • less than 2% of international development funds are specifically allocated to girls
  • school is not free in over 50 countries

sources from girl rising

photos: (1) malala yousafzai; (2) joey l. of a school for the hamar tribe in ethiopia; (3) beawiharta in jakarta of students who risk life crossing a collpased bridge to get to school; (4) muhammed muheisen in pakistan; (5) altaf gadri of an unofficial school run for slum dwellers held under a bridge in new delhi; (6) paula bronstein of burmese refugees in thailand at a school in their refugee camp; (7) noah seelam in hyderabad, india; (8) per anders pettersson, uganda; (9) lana slezic in afghanistan; (10) roberto schmidt in afghanistan, where acid attacks and poisoning of water by the taliban is on the increase at schools for girls

poynterinstitute

8. Fail well

There should be no stigma attached to failure. If you do not fail often, you are not trying hard enough. At Google, once a product fails to reach its potential, it is axed, but the company pulls from the best of the features. “Failure is actually a badge of honor,” he says. “Failure is the way to be innovative and successful. You can fail with pride.”

globalpost

nprradiopictures:

NPR photographer David Gilkey has photographed in extreme situations — from the surge in Afghanistan, to bombings in Gaza, to the tsunami in Japan, but nothing could have prepared him for what he saw in the village of Barangay 68 in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Nothing could have prepared me for what I was going to find when I arrived in Barangay 68.

"Barangay," loosely translated, means a neighborhood or village and Barangay 68 is just one of the tiny hamlets that make up greater Tacloban City in the central Philippines. The village was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

A wall of debris blocked the streets. I made my way through caverns of shattered timber and when I reached the top of the debris pile the scene was mind numbing. Ships were strewn across the hillside. Containers resting in piles of timber looked like spilled matchboxes. The only uncluttered space was the bay and the water falling away in the distance.

What I Saw: A Photographer’s Last Dispatch From The Philippines

Photo Credit: David Gilkey/NPR

good
good:

Interactive Infographic: 11 Controversial Health Innovations (That We’re Still Talking About)

From pasteurization to deet, the world has seen many health innovations that have inarguably saved lives, reduced illness, and prevented severe outbreaks. Yet whether due to unforeseen consequences, changing moral or cultural attitudes, or environmental concerns, many of these innovations have become sources of controversy and debate today.
Back in September, we launched the GOOD Pioneers of Health Challenge in search of the most creative and innovative leaders in health work across the African continent. The response we got was amazing—and diverse. Health innovation continues to highlight radical people with radical solutions to major global issues. 
This is a short list of some of the issues we’ve found ourselves talking about with friends, family, and colleagues. We know there are dozens more that we could include. So tell us: What health innovations are you talking about?


GOOD Community members Jessica Rivera and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Health, Environment and Infographics

good:

Interactive Infographic: 11 Controversial Health Innovations (That We’re Still Talking About)

From pasteurization to deet, the world has seen many health innovations that have inarguably saved lives, reduced illness, and prevented severe outbreaks. Yet whether due to unforeseen consequences, changing moral or cultural attitudes, or environmental concerns, many of these innovations have become sources of controversy and debate today.

Back in September, we launched the GOOD Pioneers of Health Challenge in search of the most creative and innovative leaders in health work across the African continent. The response we got was amazing—and diverse. Health innovation continues to highlight radical people with radical solutions to major global issues. 

This is a short list of some of the issues we’ve found ourselves talking about with friends, family, and colleagues. We know there are dozens more that we could include. So tell us: What health innovations are you talking about?

GOOD Community members Jessica Rivera and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Health, Environment and Infographics